Azure Active Directory

Update UPN from AD to Azure AD

When there was a name change in Active Directory (AD), we used to update the Universal Principal Name (UPN) in AD, then separately run the Set-MsolUserPrincipalName command to update Azure AD to the same UPN. Except, it no longer worked – I was now getting an ‘Access Denied’ message.

When trying to update the UPN via the Microsoft 365 admin center, it would correctly advise that the object was homed in AD, so changes needed to be made there. Except, they were, and Azure AD Connect was even reporting that it had seen the update and sent it off to Azure AD, no errors.

After some investigation, I found that there is now an option to allow ‘Synchronize userPrincipalName updates‘ which is off in older tenants. To check and update this:

In PowerShell, first install and connect to MSOLService. Then to check the status if UPN updates will sync and update:

Get-MsolDirSyncFeatures -Feature SynchronizeUpnForManagedUsers

If it’s $true, you’re already set. If it’s $false, update the value to $true with this command:

Set-MsolDirSyncFeature -Feature SynchronizeUpnForManagedUsers -Enable $true

In my testing, running another Azure AD Sync (both delta and full) did not resolve any already updated UPNs. I had to change the UPNs to a temporary value, sync, then change them back to the original value I wanted, and sync again. The update was instant in Azure AD once the sync had run each time.

User Can’t Receive MFA Requests for Azure AD / Microsoft 365

Was stumpted on this one and had to get advice from Microsoft Support.

A single user couldn’t log in via Multi-Factor Authentication. SMS code would say it was sent, wouldn’t come through. Phone call also wouldn’t come through. Trying to set up another MFA method aka.ms/mfasetup would receive one of these errors:

You are blocked from performing this operation. Please contact your administrator for help.

We’re sorry, we ran into a problem. Please select “Next to try again.

There were zero search results for that first error word for word, which is never a good sign.

There’s several areas you can check for blocked users such as:

https://protection.office.com/restrictedusers

https://protection.office.com/threatincidents

https://portal.azure.com/#blade/Microsoft_AAD_IAM/SecurityMenuBlade/RiskyUsers

But I couldn’t find the user listed in any of those.

After logging a case, Microsoft Support advised to check here:

https://aad.portal.azure.com/#blade/Microsoft_AAD_IAM/MultifactorAuthenticationMenuBlade/BlockedUsers/fromProviders/

And of course, that’s where the user was listed. They’d had some suspicious activity (a MFA phone call they didn’t initiate) so chose the option to block future sign in attempts, as you’d hope. This also triggered an email alert to admins, and that link is where the user’s block is listed until released.

Blocking Legacy Authentication – Conditional Access vs Authentication Policies

I’ve already written a post on why Legacy Authentication (Basic) is bad, and Modern Authentication is good. At the time of writing, Authentication Policies were the way to go to block Legacy Authentication methods. Of course, things change and there’s now a better* option to look at – Conditional Access.

I’ve also covered Conditional Access before, and it’s really hard to fault the solution. There are now Baseline policies deployed by default (still in preview though) to Azure AD tenants with recommended best practices:

Conditional Access Baseline Policies

One of these is for blocking legacy authentication – but I’m not going to recommend you turn this on (at least for starters, it’s good at the end when you know you have full modern authentication support), as it’s a tenant wide setting that has no exceptions if you need to allow legacy authentication for an account (unlike Require MFA for admins, which does allow exceptions).

Instead, you can create your own policy that does the same. This means you can gradually roll it out, and put exceptions in place until you either work around them, or live with them. If you have a requirement for an account that requires legacy auth, then you need to consider how else you’ll protect that account – can you use other Conditional Access policies to restrict it to a certain region/locations, certain apps, platforms etc – lock it down as much as you can, and make sure the account has a long unique password.

The single important setting to block legacy auth via a Conditional Access Policy is blocking access to ‘Other clients’ via Client apps:

Microsoft have a full guide on how to set this up on docs.microsoft.com.

So, why is this better than using Authentication Policies? Two main reasons:

If an account has their access or signin blocked due to an Authentication Policy, it’s not logged. You can look at the user in Azure AD and check the sign-ins, but you won’t see anything. However, if it blocked via Conditional Access, you’ll have a nice log entry showing you it was blocked:

Side note: Although in this example I was logging in from Australia, I was trying to connect to Exchange Online via PowerShell. That seems to often be detected as being in the US, so be careful with region blocking.

The other reason is that Authentication Policies can take up to 4 (!) hours to apply, although it’s often more like an hour. That is a long time to wait, and you just have to keep waiting and trying until it works – except if you did it wrong, you won’t know and you’ll keep waiting. Or, if you need to unblock access while rolling out, it’s a long time to roll back.

Authentication Policies do have their place though, they give more granular control over what you want to block or not – say you know you want to block POP3 access company wide, but not IMAP – that’s possible in there, but not via Conditional Access.

Unless you have a good reason to use Authentication Policies, just use Conditional Access (and assuming you have Azure AD Premium P1 or P2 licensing to actually let you use Conditional Access, and if you are using Azure AD you should be on that licensing anyway). It’ll make your life easier!

Office 365 Group as a Distribution List Gotchas

Office 365 Groups aren’t that new, but they still sound more alluring than a plain Distribution List or Shared Mailbox. They aren’t the solution that applies to all situations however, and you’ll need to weigh up each scenario as to what fits best.

(for Office 365 Group fundamental considerations, please read Michael Mardahl’s blogpost “Getting off to a good start with Microsoft Office 365 Groups”)

Here’s some things around Office 365 Groups and using them as an email distribution list (DL) that caught me out, or are differences worth pointing out. If you’re thinking of migrating a DL or a shared mailbox to an O365 Group, these are worth considering:

  • If a member of an Office 365 Group sends an email to the group, they won’t get that email. It makes sense that you probably don’t want an email that you sent, but it is a change of behavior from traditional DLs. This may change in the future, at least as a toggle-able option.
  • An Office 365 Group mailbox can’t have folders created in it. If staff have access to a shared mailbox and use that to manage their emails under different folders, that’s a no-go for an Office 365 Group. There’s a bunch of other ways you can manage this, but if they specifically want that option, then an Office 365 Group won’t help them.
  • By default, users will see a ‘Groups’ option in Outlook (either client or web) which they can drop down, see the groups they’re in, and see the inbox. That’s the only folder that’s visible though, and it can be easy to assume that’s the only folder. There are however, several folders available. You can’t open an Office 365 Group as another mailbox, as you’ll be told via Outlook Web that you don’t have access to the mailbox, and Outlook client won’t recognise the name of the mailbox.
    You can however, use the ‘Open Shared Mailbox’ option in Outlook Web by right clicking on your mailbox in the folder view, or right clicking on ‘Folders’ (depending on if you’re using the ‘old’ or ‘new’ Outlook) and add the Office 365 Group that way. This will give you visibility of all folders and their contents:
  • Automating Office 365 Group membership is harder. You either automate membership with a dynamic group, or let the owner(s) do it themselves. Neither are bad options, but dynamic group membership exceptions to rules are harder to do. How do you have a group that’s all Finance, plus these 4 people that aren’t finance? You could have an expression like this, but that is something that could get rather messy to maintain:

(user.department -eq “Finance”) -or (user.mail -eq “user1@domain.com”) -or (user.mail -eq “user2@domain.com”) -or (user.mail -eq “user3@domain.com”) -or (user.mail -eq “user4@domain.com”)

  • Meeting responses work differently to a DL. Say you send a meeting appointment, and have the respones go to a DL – all members of the DL see the response. This can be useful in certain scenarios, but probably not that common. An Office 365 Group works differently, where the ‘Meeting Message Processing Agent’ in Exchange Online will see the meeting response, and send it directly to the Deleted Items folder. This action skips members receiving a copy of the response which might be good generally, but again it’s another different way that Office 365 Groups work when you’re expecting the same as a DL.

That’s what I’ve found so far – if you have any yourself please share and I’ll test/add to the list, and will update with any other tricky scenarios that I come across.

Force Multi-Factor Authentication Registration in Azure Active Directory

If you’ve gone down the path of Azure Active Directory (Azure AD), then I dare say you’re not at the end. It’s a long but rewarding path, with new features constantly being added to enhance a critical service in the Microsoft offerings.

It’s also likely you didn’t start with Mutli-Factor Authentication (MFA) in place and ready to go. Maybe you did and well done! For the rest of us though, we slowly move into these systems while turning more options on.

Just enabling MFA with Conditional Access is great, but getting all users to actually register for MFA https://aka.ms/mfasetup can be a challenge. If you’re fortunate enough to have Azure AD Premium P2 licensing, you can use a MFA registration policy to do a nicely managed rollout and force people on. Those without P2 however, have an option that’s a bit hidden, not as well known and slightly scary:

Require users to register when signing in?


Under the question mark: Designates whether unregistered users are prompted to register their own authentication information when they sign in for the first time. If set to “No,” administrators must manually specify the necessary password reset authentication information in the properties for each user in this directory, or instruct users to go to the registration portal URL directly.

The description for this option is a bit misleading, it actually means that they’ll be prompted the NEXT time they log in, rather than the first time.

This option is found under Azure Active Directory > Password reset > Registration, and is off by default.

Turning this option on is a company wide setting and from my testing, worked pretty much immediately. As soon as someone who hadn’t signed up for MFA logged onto office.com, they were prompted to go through the MFA registration process. There’s no way to point this at certain users or test it, you just have that one little switch to turn it on for every single account in your tenant.

For someone who had signed up for MFA, they were asked to confirm the details entered previously.

I’d recommend letting your staff know before this option is toggled, but at least it can easily be turned off again if you run into any issues.

Update 2nd May:

After publishing this, Sean Flahie on Twitter mentioned his experience if Azure Self-Service Password Reset (SSPR) wasn’t enabled for users, and enabling the combined experience – both of which I have in place already. If you’re having any issues then please look into both of these.