Intune – Couldn’t Enroll your Device

We started having issues with new enrolments to Intune. Nothing had changed that we were aware of, but registering a new device brought up the error “Couldn’t enroll your device. You can try again or send the error information to your IT admin in an email.” iOS or Android, didn’t matter:

screenshot_20160922-180510Intune Enrollment Error

After testing multiple accounts and multiple devices, I logged a call with Office 365 support, and eventually we worked out that for my account, I didn’t have a license applied. Intune sits under our Enterprise Mobility Suite package:

licenseIntune License is “Off”?

After checking other users, I found that everyone was in this ‘Off’ state. Weird, because we hadn’t done this, and Intune licensing was being managed by a group via Azure AD as per these instructions. That configuration was still in place too when I checked. I decided to do the logical thing and ‘turn it off and back on again’ – so I disabled the assignment on that page, then re-enabled the same group with the Intune license.

After then going back to the Office 365 User search, I found that all the users had now changed to ‘on’ again. The only recent event in the last few weeks was a renewal of our licenses, so I wonder if something happened in the back end as a part of that?

Anyway, if you see the ‘Couldn’t enroll your device’ message when using the Intune Company Portal app, make sure the user has their Intune license enabled!

Installing Azure AD Connect Heath ADDS on Windows Server 2012

After trialing Azure AD Connect Health for Active Directory Domain Services on a single box, I thought it was time to roll out further. It’s easy to do on a Windows Server 2012 R2 box, but older servers need a few more steps.

The Azure AD Connect Health Agent Installation guide mentions steps for 2008 R2, but nothing for vanilla 2012.

I thought I’d try the same patches, which included Windows Management Framework 4.0 through the installer file Windows6.1-KB2819745-x64-MultiPkg – but ran into a problem when trying to install:

0x80096002Windows Update Standalone Installer
Installer encountered an error: 0x80096002
The certificate for the singer of the message is invalid or not found.

I tried several things to get around this, none of which worked (including adding the Windows Identity Foundation 3.5 role and running “wuauclt /resetauthorization /detectnow“.

An obvious statement was given to me by a colleague of “Isn’t WMF 5 out already?” – which yes, it was. I downloaded Windows Management Framework 5.0 which installed fine first time, then allowed the Azure AD ADDS install to complete after a reboot (a reboot WAS required).

This should also apply to Azure AD Connect Health AD FS Agent (what a mouthful) and Azure Active Directory Connect Sync.

Skype For Business 2016 – Flashing Active Call Window

After rolling out Skype for Business 2016 with Enterprise Voice as part of the Office 2016 suite, we discovered a weird UI issue. This is nothing but a display problem, but can still be a little distracting and annoying!

On a certain call type – incoming PSTN calls – the little active call window would flash. This took some testing to realise, as logically there shouldn’t be a corellation with how a call got to your Skype for Business client, and a display issue with a call window; but it was repeatable time and time again, on multiple PCs with different logins.

I then found a Technet thread on the issue, but this was for the older Skype for Business 2015 client, which is pretty much a reskinned Lync 2013 client. That patch wasn’t applicable to Skype for Business 2016.

I then decided to log a Microsoft Premier case, which was rather quick and after showing them the problem and waiting a few days, they came back to say the problem was planned to be fixed in the Skype for Business 2016  – December 2016 patch.

We’ll see what happens in December and I’ll update this post, but in case others discover this issue, it’s not you and you’ll need to wait a few months 🙂

Mail Merge Crashes When Opening Data Source

word crash

Sharing another problem and resolution I came across.

Recently, staff started complaining about Mail Merge crashing at the point of selecting a data source use. It was easily recreatable, and caused this event viewer error:

Faulting application name: WINWORD.EXE, version: 14.0.7113.5001, time stamp: 0x52866c04
Faulting module name: mso.dll, version: 14.0.7106.5003, time stamp: 0x5231bdf1
Exception code: 0xc0000005
Fault offset: 0x00c23ab0
Faulting process id: 0xe48
Faulting application start time: 0x01d204e6d69112b6
Faulting application path: C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Office\Office14\WINWORD.EXE
Faulting module path: C:\Program Files (x86)\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\office14\mso.dll
Report Id: 3bf6bbe2-70da-11e6-bd32-b8763fabbff5

Pretty standard for a crash. In our environment, we had changed from Lync 2010 to Skype for Business 2016, and installed Skype for Business through the Office 2016 installer rather than standalone, to make future Office product updates easier (Skype for Business standalone won’t co-exist with an Office 2016 suite install).

For some reason, this upgrade process has broken the mail merge function for Microsoft Word. The quick fix was to do a repair of the Office 2010 suite after the Office 2016 install, and mail merge worked again.

It’s worth noting that a computer that had Office 2010 suite and Office 2016 (Skype for Business only) worked fine, it was only if Lync 2010 was installed first and then removed, then Office 2016 installed.

Blank Page For Skype For Business Web App

skypeforbusiness

I had an issue recently where remote clients couldn’t connect to Skype for Business online meetings – when clicking the link, all they saw in the browser was a blank page. The tab of the browser showed ‘Skype for Business Web App’ but the page area had nothing.

This didn’t seem to affect all external clients (internal was fine), when I tested on Windows Server 2012 R2 from home it worked fine. Windows 7 however was affected, and I’m not sure on Windows 8, 8.1 or 10.

This technet post mentions it breaks ‘Conferencing Functionality and PowerPoint Presentations’ as well as ‘ White Boarding, polling’ which was caused by KB3142030. Hoping that was our problem, I uninstalled the update and rebooted – but no luck.

The next check was around .NET framework 4.6.1 which is unsupported on Exchange and Skype for Business Servers (Lync too!) but we didn’t have that installed, due to using the suggested registry setting in the linked article to block the install.

After an evening of troubleshooting and rebooting servers and firewalls that didn’t help, our support found the problem for us – a misconfigured load balancer, that had an incorrect IP for one of the front-end Skype for Business servers. Updating the IP immediately resolved the issue.

Looking back on it, that explains why I had some clients work and not others – it just appeared to be in a pattern that was OS related due to the luck of round robin routing on a load balancer!

Due to the way Skype for Business handles the web requests, by first hitting an edge server then an internal front end server, you may have multiple load balancers in the way and get partial page loading.

Another lesson learnt!

What Is eDiscovery In Security And Compliance In Office 365?

The Security and Compliance area of Office 365 does a bunch of things around securing, managing and auditing the data your organisation has in Office 365, but one area that caught my interest was the eDiscovery options.

eDiscovery is just like email – an electronic version of something that used to be done manually. If you’ve watched shows like Suits, they will show people going through a discovery process by having a room full of boxes, and having to read through all the documents by hand to find whatever smoking gun they’re after.

The ‘e’ in eDiscovery just means that all the data is digitalised (either originally because it’s digital content such as emails or files from computers, or has been scanned to convert the contents from analog to digital) and more importantly, indexed and quickly searchable.

If you were searching for ‘murder’ in an eDiscovery system, you’d put the keyword you want (murder) and point it to the set of data to search against –  just like Windows PCs can index their local data for searching the contents quickly. All documents that contain the word ‘murder’ are presented and can be read through by someone, which makes the manual process of going through a room full of boxes a bit laughable.

This is exactly what Microsoft’s eDiscovery does, with the benefit of already having your existing Office 365 data indexed. This includes all your Exchange Online mailboxes, SharePoint Online sites and OneDrive for Business content.

Microsoft Mechanics have a great demo video on how this works for a keyword search:

Of course the functionality of eDisccovery goes way beyond legal reasons, and the whole Security and Compliance solutions go far beyond the eDiscovery component.

You may also have content you want to search that’s not in Office 365 currently. PSTs can be uploaded then searched against in Exchange Online, or you can upload files to a library (SharePoint or OneDrive for Business) and search against them.

The space and compute power is something you don’t have to worry about (as long as you’ve got enough space in Office 365, which you can buy more of if needed) with this too.

There is a huge amount of documentation online about eDiscovery which will cover a lot of questions and scenarios you may have, but I think it’s best to find some test data and start playing around with it.

I’m learning the basics about eDiscovery myself, but if you’re looking to do a keyword search on a large amount of data, this is worth looking at – and assuming you have Office 365 already, shouldn’t cost you anything to use!

 

 

Lenovo Thinkpad E560 vs HP ProBook 450 G3

 

After looking for a budget but decent business laptop in Australia, I came across these two devices and thought it’d be worthwhile to compare.

The Lenovo ThinkPad E series is Lenovo’s entry level laptop type for business. If you don’t need super thin and super tough, but still want something that is customisable to your needs, these are great as entry level devices. The E560 is the latest 15.6″ model in the E series with an Intel CPU.

On the other hand, the HP ProBook 450 G3 is part of HP’s ProBook series, which is their version of the budget business laptops. I couldn’t work out what the G3 stood for after some research, if you know please share! 🙂 The 450 G3 is also a 15.6″ laptop, customisable to the specifications you choose.

20160815_173054 (Custom)Back to Back – E560 & 450 G3

After getting my hands on both laptops, there were a lot of similarities. I’ll run through some comparisons below. Specs have been sourced from the Lenovo and HP websites.

20160815_173019 (Custom)Side by Side – E560 & 450 G3

Weight and Dimensions

E560
37.7cm x 25.5cm x 2.38~2.71cm
Starting at 2.30 kg

450 G3
37.8 x 26.43 x 2.38 to 2.48 cm (front to rear) (non-touch);
37.8 x 26.46 x 2.55 to 2.65 cm (front to rear) (touch)
Starting at 2.07kg

The HP is a bit lighter to start with, but without a scale and comparing the two build I had, they felt very similar. The HP seemed to have more weight at the back while the Lenovo was more centered. Alternatively, the Lenovo is slightly smaller in length and width, but height varies from shorter to taller depending on the E560 config. To me, all of these aren’t deciding factors between the two.

Winner – Too close to call

CPU

The processor options between the two are identical for the Skylake 6th generation ‘i series’ of Intel CPUs. i3, i5 and i7 are all choosable with the same variant on both models. The HP also has a Pentium processor option, but this is very low end and I personally wouldn’t consider this.

Winner – Both

RAM

Again, both laptops can go up to 16GB of DDR RAM. Interestingly, the Lenovo is DDR3 1600Mhz while the HP is DDR4 2133Mhz. This might sound major, but the performance difference between the two is negligible when benchmarked. Not a deciding factor between the two here, even though it’s nicer to have a newer technology 🙂

Winner – HP slightly

Storage

450 G3

  • 500 GB SATA (7200 rpm)
  • 500 GB up to 2 TB SATA (5400 rpm)
  • 128 GB up to 256 GB M.2 SATA TLC SSD
  • 500 GB SATA SSHD (5400 rpm)

E560

  • 500GB 7200 RPM HDD
  • 500GB 5400rpm Solid State Hybrid Drive (SSHD) with 8GB NAND flash memory
  • 1TB 5400 RPM HDD
  • 192GB SSD (although I could find a 256GB SSD option)

Yet again, we’re seeing similar options. I wouldn’t go past SSD, but you do pay a small premium for that. For an entry level business laptop 128GB is probably enough too, but the 256GB is a nice bit of extra room. The HP has the newer M.2 SATA style SSD, but again there is very little difference in that versus the SATA SSD contained in the Lenovo.

Winner – HP slightly

Display

450 G3

  • 15.6″ diagonal HD anti-glare flat LED-backlit (1366 x 768)
  • 15.6″ diagonal full HD anti-glare slim LED-backlit (1920 x 1080)
  • 15.6″ diagonal HD flat LED-backlit touch screen (1366 x 768)

E560

  • 15.6″ HD (1366 x 768) Anti-Glare, 220 nits
  • 15.6″ FHD (1920 x 1080) IPS, Anti-Glare, 250 nits

 

20160815_172738 (Custom)450 G3 & E560 displays

I couldn’t visibly tell a difference in quality between the two. The HP is the only one with a touch option, but you’ll pay for that benefit. If you need touch, then the 450 G3 is the only choice. Otherwise, I’d recommend either with a 1920 x 1080 resolution

Winner: Both, (HP if you need touchscreen)

Graphics

450 G3

  • Onboard Intel HD
  • AMD Radeon™ R7 M340 (1 or 2 GB DDR3 dedicated, switchable)

E560

  • Onboard Intel HD
  • AMD Radeon™ R7 M370 2 GB GDDR5

 

As the Intel HD graphics is part of the CPU, those are again identical between the two models. If you need more grunt though, the E560 has the clear advantage of a better discreet graphics card. Many businesses may not care about this, but if you’re doing modeling or other GPU intensive tasks, this could matter

Winner: Both, (Lenovo if you need a dedicated GPU)

Ports

450 G3

  • 2 USB 3.0
  • 2 USB 2.0
  • 1 HDMI
  • 1 headphone/microphone combo
  • 1 AC power
  • 1 RJ-45
  • 1 VGA
  • 1 multi-format digital media reader

E560

  • 3 x USB 3.0
  • 4-in-1 card reader (MMC, SD, SDHC, SDXC)
  • Lenovo OneLink Docking Port
  • VGA
  • HDMI
  • Combo audio/microphone jack
  • Ethernet (RJ45)
  • Security keyhole

20160815_172940 (Custom)20160815_172925 (Custom)20160815_172909 (Custom)E560 on top of the 450 G3

Having lots of useful ports is important. The Lenovo has an extra USB 3 port at the cost of two USB 2.0 ports. Personally I’d rather the 3 x USB 3.0 but if you need a wired keyboard and mouse, then those would be better used on the HP’s two USB 2.0 ports, leaving two USB 3.0 free. The Lenovo having the Onelink Docking Port is good if you want a dock, otherwise on the HP you’d have to use one of the USB 3.0 ports for this.

Winner: Too close to call

Camera

450 G3

  • 720p HD webcam

E560

  • Integrated 720p HD Camera, with Dual MIC
  • 720p HD Intel® RealSense™ 3D Camera

The quality of the two cameras are the same, but the Lenovo has an optional Intel RealSense 3D Camera. The model I had was set up this way, which gives you Windows Hello sign in – look at the camera for a second and you’re logged in without touching the laptop. This is one of those features that you won’t be bothered about until you have it, then you’ll be annoyed when you use another computer missing the feature!

Winner: Lenovo (if you want to pay extra for RealSense)

Keyboard and Trackpad

 

20160815_172837 (Custom)HP ProBook 450 G3 Keyboard and Trackpad

20160815_172844 (Custom)Lenovo ThinkPad E560 Keyboard and Trackpad

These are more of a personal preference, but to me the Lenovo keyboard and trackpad were a lot nicer than the HP’s. The trackpad itself feels of higher quality, as do the keys. The HP does have an optional backlit keyboard though, so if you’re doing a lot of typing in the dark, that may trump the quality and feel of the Lenovo. The lenovo also has a pointing stick, and full arrow keys which you can see in the photos above.

Winner: Lenovo

Wrap up

There were some other features I didn’t mention, such as both having a DVD drive – but this doesn’t help you choose between the two. The Lenovo is most customisable online where each option was a tickable addon, clearly showing the cost when purchasing. HP seemed to be more clunky, where I could only find a single model for sale that couldn’t be customised. Speaking to them online or contacting them may be a way to get the particular features you want.

Due to this, I couldn’t spec both up the way I’d want and give a price comparison. Here’s the optional specifications I’d pick which both models support, which should be best bang for buck:

Processor : Intel Core i5-6200U Processor (3MB Cache, up to 2.80GHz)
Operating System : Windows 10 Professional 64
Hard Drive : 256 GB Solid State Drive, SATA3 OPAL2.0 – Capable
Display : 15.6 FHD (1920×1080) IPS Non-Touch
Memory : 8GB PC3-12800 1600MHz DDR3L (1 DIMM)
Graphics : Intel HD Onboard

Of course, the dedicated AMD GPU would be nice, and depending on price I’d add one on too.

If you haven’t guessed by now, there’s no clear winner. I’d be choosing on price primarily, and if it happened to be the same, the above information will hopefully help you pick one over the other, depending which little extras you want. Both are solid laptops, and with the right specifications neither would be a regrettable purchase.

 

I was also asked this on Twitter about the comparison of the two laptops:

 

 

My answer on this is the same, both would be a great fit and I’d choose on price. The laptop can be connected to your TV via HDMI, and a remote connected via USB dongle to control something like Kodi.

If you have any questions or comments, please write below!